Winning TV Screenplays for May 2018

Watch readings of the winning screenplays performed by professional actors:

ACTORGALAPAGOS – TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Lukas Hassel

ACTORREMOTELY WORKING – Comedy TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Bill Baber

ACTORMY MOTHER MURDERED MY FATHER – 1st Scene TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading

ACTORTIME SLIP – Best Scene TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Meredith Hill

ACTORTWEED – Best Scene TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Christopher SCott McClure Phd.

ACTORDELIVER ME PIZZARIE – Best TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Anne Luong

ACTORPAYCHECK 2 PAYCHECK – Best Scene TV Screenplay
May 2018 Reading
by Chris Skeeter

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Matthew Toffolo
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: Kimberly Villarruel
Camera Operator: Mary Cox

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TV PILOT SCI-FI – GALAPAGOS, by by Lukas Hassel

 

Genre: Sci-Fi, Adventure

It’s year 2437. 3000 meters under the icy crust of earth, the last remaining pocket of humanity struggles to answer the question: Is life for the sake of living any life at all?Extinction is the rule. Survival, the exception.

CAST LIST:

Red: Lara Amersey
Charlotte: Jane Smythe
Captain: Rais Moui
Narrator: Hugh Ritchie
Dan: Scott McCulloch
Bram: Tim Paul McCarthy
Laura: Georgia Grant
Ash: Alicia Payne

Get to know the writer:

1. What is your TV Pilot screenplay about?

What happens inside and outside Station Galápagos is a harsh examination of the things we don’t understand and the things we refuse to understand; the leaps of faith we take; the tough choices we are forced to make; and the fine points that can make our existence worthwhile.

It tries to answer the question: is hope for good or for bad?

2. Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

This show contains a darkness I have not yet seen on TV. This will not be about sfx and pretty people, but real conflicts and characters in extreme situations. Galápagos would be able to shine a light on a future that could very well become a reality.

3. How would you describe this script in two words?

Dark. Uncompromising.

4. What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

I don’t watch much TV, but i did enjoy Black Mirror.

5. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

This was originally a screenplay I wrote 5 years ago. Took me a year. The toughest script to date I have written. I always felt it would make a great TV show, and so adapted parts of the screenplay into a TV pilot to learn the format better. The pilot adaptation took another 4 months.

6. How many stories have you written?

I have written 6 screenplays (4 of which I’m really happy with), 2 short screenplays (both made into succesful short films – “Into the Dark” and “The Son, the Father…”), and TV pilot.

7. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

“One More Kiss, Dear” from Blade Runner

8. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Not having written for TV before – spending a lot of time understanding the structure of a feature film screenplay – I had to adapt my format and technique to fit a different medium. I learned a lot about the differences in the media.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Staying present, being kind, standing up for myself, owning my strengths and weaknesses, fighting injustice, highlighting ignorance, questioning manmade religion.

10. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I had been fortunate enough to have won before with a different script, and really enjoyed watching the reading (via youtube link). I knew it would be helpful to me. The positive feedback was extremely welcome at a time when i was doubting the strength of my material.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

FilmFreeway is great. User friendly and easy.

12. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Locate writers who are better than you, and get feedback. Rewrites are essential. Don’t be afraid of sharing your work. The most common mistake I see with films out there on the festival circuit is that the script wasn’t ready. It was not fully developed/thought through. Never think your script can’t improve.

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: Kimberly Villarruel

Camera Op: Mary Cox

Winning TV Screenplays for April 2018

Watch readings of the winning screenplays performed by professional actors:

ACTORTV FAN FICTION PILOT: SCOOBY DOO: AGE OF AQUARIUS
April 2018 Reading
by Katie Grotzinger
ACTORJOHN Q TV Best Scene Screenplay
April 2018 Reading
by Jason Jung
ACTORESC(APE) ONLINE TV Best Scene Screenplay
April 2018 Reading
by Christopher Kerr
ACTORDRAGONS AND WOLVES – TV Best Scene Screenplay
April 2018 Reading
by Drew Henriksen
ACTORGLOBAL FUND – TV Best Scene Screenplay
April 2018 Reading
by

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Matthew Toffolo
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: Kimberly Villarruel
Camera Operator: Mary Cox

TV COMEDY BEST SCENE Reading of FUNNY FARM, by Deshon Porter & Donnell Porter

Genre: Comedy, Political

A hotshot young politician pus his campaign on hold when he pleads insanity to escape jail time, but he spends more time trying to earn his career back than his sanity.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Jessica: Ali Chappell
Server: Scott McCulloch
Sam: Gabriel Darku
Cashier: Val Cole
Delivery Person: Peter-Mark Raphael

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?

Funny farm is about a couple who is just about to get married and want a change in their lives, they don’t want to live in the noise of the city. They want to be in the subs where it is a lot less noisier. this would be perfect for either a sitcom or a film.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

This is really good for TV sitcom but it can also be good for a funny movie.

. 3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This film should be made into a movie because a lot of people need to laugh in the theaters again, it will be fun to go see a funny movie.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Real fun

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Titanic

7. How many stories have you written?

Fur

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Hall of Fame

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Getting tired at times when I really wanted to get it done.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I Love to host and produce my own online radio show the big d zone. I also enjoy helping the church get out to more places on the radio.

in memory of my late wife tresa donnell porter

Let me add that my late wife would have been proud to see this day for this is her work as well my only wish is she was here to see people enjoy the work .

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Camera Op: Mary Cox

TV HORROR BEST SCENE Reading of PEEL, by Matthew Torti

Genre: Horror

Logline: A struggling make-up artist is given the opportunity to work alongside the industry’s most successful actor, who is secretly a real life monster.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Jimmy:Peter-Mark Raphael
Creedance: Scott McCulloch

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?
PEEL is a television series about a struggling make-up artist that is gifted the opportunity to work alongside the industry’s most successful actor, who is secretly a real life monster.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?
Horror.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?
PEEL focuses on people who wear masks, in both the literal and metaphorical sense, which I feel touches on some important current issues we are facing. But it also tells a story that is entertaining, fun, creepy and serious in equal measure, since horror is one of the most important genres in that, historically, it can adopt a variety of different tones without losing sight of its true identity.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?
Honest. Fantastical.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?
BEETLEJUICE.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?
Seven months.

7. How many stories have you written?
7 features and 4 pilots.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)
The Grand Finale by Danny Elfman (from EDWARD SCISSORHANDS)

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?
It was a challenge to find where the characters wanted to go. Even though I write treatments, once I start writing a script I often let the character choose their own path. More often than not, the challenge is making sure they make decisions that serve them and the story.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?
Reading, playing music, spending as much time as I can with my son.

******

Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier

Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne

Editor: John Johnson

Camera Op: Mary Cox

Winning TV PILOT Reading of MINNIE NOIR, by Katie Grotzinger

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR: Becky Shrimpton
Minnie: Kate Varadi
Nick: Scott Beaudin
Dash: Merlin Simard
Ms. Kirkpatrick: Mahtab Sabet
Connor: Allan Brunet
Lincoln: Anthony Tran

Get to know the writer: 

What is your TV Pilot screenplay about?

Minnie Hughes is a hardboiled noir detective that also just so happens to also be the shortest girl in the fourth grade. When a candidate for class president’s show and tell South African ostrich egg goes missing, Minnie jumps on the case. Meanwhile, she also deals with her best friend Lincoln Park feeling under appreciated after she calls him her secretary and struggles with asking her crush, Vijay Sampat, a kind of male femme fatale, to be her dance partner for gym class.

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

There are so many wonderful cartoons right now inspired by Japanese anime. They take joy in taking the viewer to strange lands and entertaining them with awesome action sequences. I think that’s great, but I also think there’s much to be mined from American genres like noir. Additionally, I think there’s room for quieter shows that embrace more what it’s like to be a kid. I think Hey Arnold and Recess both did that beautifully and I’d like to write something like that for kids growing up.

Most of all, Minnie is for every weirdo kid that finds solace into escaping into another world for one reason or another. For Minnie, it’s noir and her love of mystery comes from the fact that she never got to know her parents, so they’re the biggest mystery of all. If this show could make some kid feel less alone, that would the greatest honor.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Kid Noir

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

South Park!

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Good question! This was actually my thesis project for my Screenwriting MFA at DePaul University in Chicago. I worked on this for a few semesters and now continue to tinker with it off and on.

How many stories have you written?

Quite a few! I try to write every day and have accumulated hundreds of false starts over the years. I have a handful of scripts I’m truly proud of.

What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

I’d say right now it’s “Something Beautiful” by Pansy Division.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I had a clear idea of the A story in mind from the get go, but my MFA thesis professor and classmates really challenged me to flesh out the B and C stories and I think the pilot is much stronger for it.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I’m a total true crime geek. I regularly follow two true crime podcasts – The Last Podcast on the Left and My Favorite Murder. Both are absolutely fantastic. If I can’t think of anything to watch, I’ll turn on a cheesy serial killer documentary. Also, my favorite true crime book right now is The Yoga Store Murder: The Shocking True Account of the Lululemon Athletica Killing by Dan Morse.

Believe or not, my fascination with The Zodiac Killer actually made its way into an episode of Minnie Noir I’ve been writing – the Christmas special to boot! Nothing violent though, of course. Minnie just struggles to crack a mysterious, intensely complicated code from letters she’s received. (The code, naturally, is composed from stickers.)

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Despite working and reworking on this pilot as much as I have, I still recognize that it could always be better. I have a big place in my heart for this story and I want to do anything I can to make it the best it can be, so feedback is a must.

And it’s funny! See, originally, I had two characters named Connor. This was for a couple of reasons. For one, when I was growing up, there was a year where we had three Connors to one class, all spelled the same way, only to be identified by the first initial of their last name. I also have a common name and there’s usually another Katie, so I empathized. It seems like such a staple of childhood. It was also a shoutout to shows I loved growing up like Ed, Edd n’ Eddy and the Ashleys from Recess where the same names are part of the camaraderie and comedy.

But I had gotten the note before that having two Connors was confusing. I finally made the change when I got the note from you guys! Thank you for finally getting me to change it.

You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It’s been stellar! I’ve submitted a bunch of stuff through FilmFreeway and appreciate how easy it is to find specific contests for certain projects.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

I have difficulty finishing scripts unless I have someone to bounce ideas off of. Having a community of writers, or even just one friend, to get feedback from makes scripts come together so much easier and better than they would be in just the isolated writer bubble we all sometimes fall into. Also, watch episodes or read scripts similar to what you’re going for. It’s not only fun, but it’ll give you some inspiration.

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Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com

Director: Kierston Drier
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson

Camera Operator: Mary Cox

Winning TV PILOT Reading of DOWN WITH THE BUREAUCRACY by Dimitry Pompée

Watch the January 2017 Winning TV PILOT Screenplay.

Best Scene from the screenplay DOWN WITH THE BUREAUCRACY Screenplay
Written by Dimitry Pompee

CAST LIST:

NARRATOR – Sean Ballantyne
NATHAN – Gabriel Darku
KAREN/PAULA – Val Cole
LUKE – Nick Wicht
MYLES – Charles Gordon
ALLIE/NORA – Shannon McNally
QUINN – Catherine D’Angelo
BARLOWE – David Straus

SYNOPSIS:

Genre: Comedy, Political

After being framed for treason and losing his job at a prestigious DC lobbying firm, an arrogant grad student finds himself forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America.

 Get to know the writer:

What is your TV Pilot screenplay about?

My pilot, Down With The Bureaucracy, is about an arrogant graduate student named Nathan who is forced to take an entry-level position at the second-worst federal agency in America in order to keep his academic scholarship. While Nathan is hostile to all of his coworkers at first, he finds he must convince them to help him save his job when his spiteful manager tries to fire him on the first day.

Why should this screenplay be made into a TV show?

Aside from the fact that I think it would be a pretty funny show, I think there’s a huge audience for a sitcom about how ridiculous it can be working at the lower rungs of the federal government. We certainly have some amazing shows like Veep that mock the people in the corridors of power, but there are plenty of people in the lesser-known agencies who could use the same treatment.

At the same time, I also want to create a show that demonstrates the good that the federal workforce can do. Not only could this show derive material from the incompetence of the federal bureaucracy, it can show that there are plenty of talented and dedicated federal employees who are keeping this country afloat. I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of a better way to endear people to their government than through a show about a group of bumbling coworkers who occasionally manage to do a decent job. Well, aside from a civics class.

How would you describe this script in two words?

Utterly rewarding.

What TV show do you keep watching over and over again?

It’s only rounding out its second season, but I think I’ve watched every episode of NBC’s Superstore about seventeen times each. It’s an excellent example of how to use an ensemble cast full of absurd characters to create a compelling and hilarious sitcom. The same can be said of The Good Place, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Community, Parks and Rec, 30 Rock, and all the other shows I find myself watching again and again.

How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve been working on this one for about two years and a half now. I recently compared the first draft from May 2014 with this current draft, and while many of the core pieces remain intact, it is radically different than it used to be. Hopefully, it’s better too!

How many stories have you written?

This is a difficult question to answer, because I have several scripts in various stages of “completion.” I would say that I have four scripts in what you might call late-stage drafts, and many others that are in earlier stages of editing, drafting, outlining, or nascent, amorphous chaos.

What motivated you to write this screenplay?

When I was in grad school, I was also working full-time and I was very unhappy with my employment situation. I was bored and frustrated, and all of my job applications were met with silence, so I felt like I was stuck. I can’t even remember what the situation was, but one day, some nonsense happened at work and I said something to the effect of, “That is so stupid, it could be in a sitcom.” I started writing that very night. And I did end up leaving that job for something much better soon after, but not before taking extensive notes about working there that I’ve used in my pilot.

What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I don’t believe it’s done yet, but there have been some obstacles in getting it to this point. The most vexing obstacle for me was and remains developing a consistent writing habit, then sticking to it. I try do some writing during lunch at work, and then after coming home and foraging through the fridge for a somewhat healthy dinner, I write some more. Some days are better than others, but I figure as long as I can get SOMETHING down every day, I can count it as a success.

Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Video games, a free and open internet, and naps. Pretty much anything I can do on my couch.

What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I entered the festival precisely because of the reputation of the feedback. It can be challenging to find sources for insightful feedback when you’re outside of an academic or professional setting, especially if you’re just starting out and you have no connections. Several friends of mine who had previously entered the festival told me that the feedback they received was incredibly helpful, and I absolutely agree. After digesting and utilizing the notes I received, I can say with utmost certainty that my script is leagues ahead of where it was before the festival.

Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Many people have said this in much more insightful ways, but I’d advise other writers to always be open to receiving constructive feedback, and to seek it out specifically. It’s not easy hearing something you’ve been working on for a long time isn’t as good as you think it is, but receiving that type of criticism is essential to developing your skills as a writer. Don’t take it personally, don’t ignore it, and use it to improve your work.

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Director/Producer: Matthew Toffolo http://www.matthewtoffolo.com
Casting Director: Sean Ballantyne
Editor: John Johnson


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